University of Redlands Spatial Research Symposium 2017

Join us to celebrate spatial research and community service conducted by students, faculty, administrators, and campus programs! All events at Lewis Hall on the University of Redlands campus.
 Environmental-Justice-2014 Lightning Talks by Students and Faculty (4-6 PM)
 Poster presentation Poster Presentations by Students and Faculty (4-6 PM)
 Panel Keynote Panel (6-7 PM)
 Reception Reception (7-7:30 PM)

Lightning Talks by Students and Faculty (4-6 PM)

Lightning talk presentation times are subject to change.

Time

Presenter(s)

Discipline(s)

Title

 4:00 Mehrdad Koohikamali and James Pick Business and GIS Social Media and Big Data for better MIS and GIS Teaching and Learning
 4:13 Hillary Jenkins and Scout Dahms-May Environmental Science, Dendrochronology, Paleoclimatology, Atmospheric Chemistry, Dendroclimatology Tales Trees Tell: Using Tree Rings to Map Pollution & Drought in the AR Sandbox
4:26 Nader Afzalan Geodesign and Environmental Studies Take 10 Minutes to Shape the Future of University of Redlands Campus
 4:39 Lei Lani Stelle, Adrian Laufer, and Tessa Foster Marine Ecology, GIS, Mobile Technology Mapping Marine Mammal Sightings with Esri’s Collector for ArcGIS
 4:52 Jason Lemus Economics, Socioeconomics, Business Implementing Location Analytics and Big Data Across the Business Curriculum
 5:05 Madeline Catterson Environmental Science and Biodiversity Mapping the Biodiversity of Ethiopia
 5:18 Sumner MacPherson and Shellie Zias-Roe Civic Ecology: Planting Trees in Underserved Communities Ecology, Land Use Planning, Governance, GIS, Community Stewardship
 5:31 Liz Parrish Geospatial analysis, Geostatistics, Geography, GIS, Social Science Multivariate and Geospatial Analysis of Technology Utilization in Latin America and the Caribbean
5:44 Steven Moore and Nate Strout Spatial Studies, UAVs, and Remote Sensing What’s Up with Drones At the University of Redlands?
5:57 Nader Afzalan Geodesign and Environmental Studies University of Redlands Campus Geodesign Results

Poster Presentations by Students and Faculty (4-6 PM)

Presenter(s)

Disciplines

Title

Jack Hewitt Cartography Cartography
Sean Milligan and Calvin Cruikshank Computer Science, Spatial Sciences, Math Powerful CEO’s Religious Beliefs
Quinn Navarro, Spencer Tibbitts, and Carlos Monroy Religious Studies, Spatial Studies, History, Medicine Medicinal/Healing Sites of the Ancient World
 Julieta Perez Environmental Studies, Planning, GIS Park Equity in Redlands, California
Adrian Laufer and Tessa Foster Environmental Science, Biology, Spatial Studies Spatial Analysis of Marine Mammals in the Southern California Bight
Alexis Jimenez Maldonado, Meghan O’Sullivan, and Drew Garbe Chemistry, Biology, Public Policy, Religious Studies, Environmental Studies, Spatial Studies St. Brendan’s Voyage Through Catholicism and Medicine
Bailee Goodman, Chloe Kennedy, and Arianne Rodriguez History, Religious Studies, Psychology, Sociolgy, Spatial studies The Jewish Silk Road
Ella Huster, Chryse Kruse, and Sammy Mouazzen Art History, History, Religious Studies Tracing Depiction of the “Virgin Mary”
Chryse Kruse Religious Studies, Spatial Studies The Travels of St. Raphael

Keynote Panel Discussion:
Building Collaborations with Esri (6-7 PM)

 Steven Moore Steven Moore, Director of Spatial Studies, University of Redlands (Moderator)
 David DiBiase David DiBiase, Director of Education, Esri
 Douglas Flewelling Douglas Flewelling, Professor and Director of the MS GIS Program, University of Redlands
 Lillian Larson Lillian Larson, Professor, Religious Studies, University of Redlands
 Rebecca Lyons Rebecca Lyons, Associate Professor, Chemistry, University of Redlands
 Kathy Ogren Kathy Ogren, Provost, University of Redlands
 Jim Pick Jim Pick, Professor, School of Business and Director, GISAB, University of Redlands
 Gary Scott Gary Scott, Visiting Assistant Professor, School of Education and Project Director, Spatial STEM+C

Reception (7-7:30 PM)

Socializing Stay after the keynote panel to chat with the panelists and enjoy some snacks.

Abstracts

Cartography

I will be displaying the maps I have created during my independent study. I will discuss the maps I created as well as the techniques that I used.

Civic Ecology: Planting Trees in Underserved Communities

Civic ecology is the study of community-driven environmental stewardship practices, their outcomes for individuals, communities, and ecosystems, and their interactions with the governance institutions and social-ecological systems in which they take place. In the fall, 2016, a class of First Year Seminar students engaged in a course titled “Sowing the Seeds of Community Resilience: Engaging in Civic Ecological Practices.” The course sent students on a journey of using various mapping methods to determine areas in communities that are declining or underserved, in a sense, broken. The students explored the people, places, and practices that restore nature, while also revitalizing neighborhoods through a community service learning project. The project covered contemporary thinking in resilience, social-ecological systems, and the relationship of nature to human and community wellbeing. Students in the course planted 50 shade trees in disadvantaged areas of Redlands to fulfill the requirements of the Neighborhood Grows Grant. This grant is a $10,000 grant to mitigate climate change by planting trees in disadvantaged communities within the County of San Bernardino. The grant utilizes cap and trade funds recovered under AB32, the Global Solutions Warming Act. Locations were selected through using the CalEnviro Screen 2.0 maps. This poster presentation will share the overall experience of the civic ecology project and how the students were introduced to GIS as they considered viable locations to plant the proposed trees, existing trees, and other related park infrastructure. Story maps were also completed to share the story of the experience by each of the students.

Ecology, Land Use Planning, Governance, GIS, Community Stewardship

Civic ecology is the study of community-driven environmental stewardship practices, their outcomes for individuals, communities, and ecosystems, and their interactions with the governance institutions and social-ecological systems in which they take place. In the fall, 2016, a class of First Year Seminar students engaged in a course titled “Sowing the Seeds of Community Resilience: Engaging in Civic Ecological Practices.” The course sent students on a journey of using various mapping methods to determine areas in communities that are declining or underserved, in a sense, broken. The students explored the people, places, and practices that restore nature, while also revitalizing neighborhoods through a community service learning project. The project covered contemporary thinking in resilience, social-ecological systems, and the relationship of nature to human and community wellbeing. Students in the course planted 50 shade trees in disadvantaged areas of Redlands to fulfill the requirements of the Neighborhood Grows Grant. This grant is a $10,000 grant to mitigate climate change by planting trees in disadvantaged communities within the County of San Bernardino. The grant utilizes cap and trade funds recovered under AB32, the Global Solutions Warming Act. Locations were selected through using the CalEnviro Screen 2.0 maps. This poster presentation will share the overall experience of the civic ecology project and how the students were introduced to GIS as they considered viable locations to plant the proposed trees, existing trees, and other related park infrastructure. Story maps were also completed to share the story of the experience by each of the students.

Implementing Location Analytics and Big Data Across the Business Curriculum

Advancements in technology and analytics tools have made the use of Data Science and Business Analytics a necessity for the viability of organizations globally. As such, it has become imperative for business students to become acquainted with location analytics and Big Data. By adopting best practices from the literature, strategies to infuse location analytics across the curricula in diverse business disciplines such as Information Systems, Marketing, Operations, and Analytics are recommended. In this particular work, we examine the geodemographic attributes of participants in the sharing economy using AirBnB as an example. AirBnB provides a peer-to-peer marketplace for housing worldwide. Airbnb has become popular because it has made short term stays more affordable for consumers while also creating profits for landlords. Using AirBnB rental listings in major metropolitan cities across the U.S., we examine the socio-economic tapestry of neighborhoods within those cities with the objective of determining demographic, economic, innovation, and social capital correlates of the sharing economy and its workers. This analysis can be used in a business curriculum to gain a nuanced understanding of the mechanisms behind the sharing economy. Descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive aspects of decision-making enabled by location-based analytics and its implications for business education are discussed. Strategies to infuse location analytics in business curricula based on contemporary social and economic phenomena and related datasets are presented.

The Jewish Silk Road

Our poster will showcase our take on the possibility of there being a Jewish Silk Road. Based off of the book The Itinerary of Benjamin of Tudela, we have hypothesized the possibility of there being a separate route that follows the original Silk Road but only used by Jewish people. Benjamin created his route based off of the locations of other Jewish people and/or tribes in each city, country and continent that he stopped in. Through various sources and tools such as the Jewish Encyclopedia, the book titled Religions of the Silk Road, and GIS we are creating a map of the route or routes we believe to be the Jewish Silk Road. We want to answer the question of why Benjamin’s route, which started in northern Spain and ended in modern day Israel, is still memorialized to this day and why it is so important.

Mapping the Biodiversity of Ethiopia

During the University’s May term to Ethiopia, I recorded raw observations of the mammals seen on the journey with the hopes that obtaining the geographic distribution ranges of the species would illuminate the biodiversity of Ethiopia’s highlands. I downloaded the spatial distributions from the IUCN Red List website and created a spatial join of all the polygons for the 15 different mammal layers. With the spatial join layer, I added a “Range Overlap” field to calculate the number of species present in each polygon. The results show that the polygons with the highest number of species present are the Bale Mountains. Located at the beginning of the East African Rift Valley, the Ethiopian Highlands are a biodiversity hotspot.

Mapping Marine Mammal Sightings with Esri’s Collector for ArcGIS

There is extensive overlap between marine mammal populations and human activities within the southern California bight.  These interactions are investigated by conducting vessel-based surveys.  In summer 2016, we compared protocols recording sightings with traditional methods (GPS and written records) to Collector for ArcGIS.  Although it took longer to record with Collector, we’ve converted our methods due to the reduced time spent processing data, and the ability to quickly visualize/analyze sightings, demonstrating the effectiveness of Collector in field research.

Medicinal/Healing Sites of the Ancient World

In a modern context it can often become difficult to comprehend, or even just visualize, how religion and medicine overlap. In this study, we investigate the geographical locations of medicinal/healing sites in the context of the ancient world. The purpose of this investigation is to generate a better visual understanding of how ancient medicinal and religious locations overlapped. This study juxtaposes intensive cartographical research while integrating spatial studies techniques to enhance the ultimate construction of a map that displays the geographical locations of medicinal/healing sites across the ancient world’s geographical landscape. Each location displays information pertaining to that respective site, as a result of brief research that each location underwent, as to contribute to the overall richness of the map. Furthermore, a parallel study that took place used the collected data to further investigate each specific location in order to better comprehend the functions of medicinal/religious sites in the ancient world, alongside the visualization provided from this study. The findings will also allow further studies to take place in which the map can be interpreted and analyzed in order to expand the contemporary understanding of how medicine and religion overlapped in the ancient world, and continue to do so in modern times.

Multivariate and Geospatial Analysis of Technology Utilization in Latin America and the Caribbean

This exploratory empirical study examines the extent of differences in information and communication technology (ICT) utilization among the various countries of Latin America and the Caribbean (LA&C). This work also enhances understanding of factors that impact ICT utilization and the digital divide in LA&C countries. In contrast to previous empirical studies, more advanced forms of ICT such as broadband and social media technologies are included as ICT dependent variables. In our conceptual model of ICT utilization, known as Spatially Aware Technology Utilization Model (SATUM), seven dependent variables are posited to be associated with seventeen demographic, socio-economic, education, technology tariff, societal openness, infrastructure, and ICT services competitiveness independent variables. ICT utilization dependent variables are spatially analyzed to determine patterns of agglomeration or randomness, and regression residuals are tested for the presence of spatial bias. We determine that human development and civil liberties are the dominant predictors of ICT utilization. For a smaller sample of nations that excludes smaller island nations of the Caribbean, human development remains significant for only fixed telephone subscriptions and number of internet users per capita. However, urban population and political rights are determined to be dominant predictors for five ICTs and English as a primary language is no longer influential. Policy implications of these findings are discussed.

Park Equity in Redlands, California

This project will explore problems and solutions towards applying sustainable practices to park infrastructure. Communities have not always created parks equal to other parks within the same community. This project will look at two different parks within a Southern California community park system to identify, what if any, inequalities that are present in the existing park system. All individuals of a community have a right to open space, however where they live appears to influence the type of open space available to them. This project will include maps and data of the two parks located in the underprivileged part of the community of Redlands, California. Upon initial investigation, it was observed that not both of the parks offer equal amenities. Could this be due to the time periods in which the parks were built? Many different types of parks serve a variety of needs. There is still room for improvement to provide equal benefits to meet all of the citizens needs. Providing individuals of the community with capacity building can encourage involvement towards creating parks designed by the citizens.

Powerful CEO’s Religious Beliefs

In this poster, we present the results of our research on the different religions of powerful CEOs in relation to their birthplaces around the world. We found that a CEO’s religion is often synonymous with the local tradition from where they are born. By mapping the location of a CEOs birthplace it is very easy to determine where he was born and what the common religion of that area is. It is also interesting to see if a religion has an effect on a CEO’s individual “success”.

Social Media and Big Data for better MIS and GIS Teaching and Learning

The talk will discuss a spatial research project which applies social media and spatial big data to improve teaching of MIS and GIS for School of Business students. The intent of the project is to expose business and IT students to the potential of social media to provide information and conduct research to solve problems and make decisions. This builds off of a trend in industry to support use of social media as a mainstream data source for many applications.

Twitter is chosen as the social media channel for initial exercises, a choice based on twitter’s default of spatial referenced messages, user friendliness, and the presence of public domain software for performing analytics on numerous twitter messages, in order to sort messages for quality kernels of the most relevant and quality messages and associated content. This analysis gives an initial set of messages and associated content that relate to the business research objective. Once the messages are reduced to the kernel, it can be mapped using Tableau analytics software, which the students learned in a prior exercise.

As an outcome, the group reports on the business information obtained, the process students used to gather the information, and on their assessment of how useful social media could be as a serious tool for their own organizations.  Individually, the students provide reports on their use of tweets for analytics, as well as the spatial arrangement of the kernel of twitter messages, and what location of social media messaging implies for business decision-making.

Spatial Analysis of Marine Mammals in the Southern California Bight

Since 2012, data has been recorded in the Southern California bight, from boat transects based out of Dana Point harbor, extending coastally between San Onofre to Newport Beach, as well as around Catalina Island. For each marine mammal sighting, the species, number, behavior, location, and ocean conditions were recorded, along with photographs to identify individual animals. We recently transitioned our data collection protocol to ESRI’s Collector App, so data entered on a mobile tablet is automatically mapped, and then is visualized and analyzed with ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Pro. Additional layers in ArcGIS Pro reveal that cetacean sightings occur most frequently along the continental shelf, and around knolls. Species observed in summer 2016 differed greatly from those of the past four summers: Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sightings decreased, while Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) sightings increased. Sea surface temperature data illustrates a higher than normal temperature, which may be attributed to the shift in marine mammal species.

St. Brendan’s Voyage Through Catholicism and Medicine

Through visualizing and understanding St. Brendan’s voyage we can connect the relationship between the spread of medicine and Catholicism. By looking at Catholic figures and their journey’s we were able to see overlap in medicine spread by monks. We researched the physical travels of St. Brendan and by doing so, we were able to map out Catholicism spreading through medicine. Through these voyages, we found that monk’s were practicing medicine through the church community. There was major overlap when it came to medicine and Catholicism because the monks were offering medical help to people of the community.

Take 10 minutes to shape the future of University of Redlands Campus

If you are not making memories, you are not alive. Designers have important roles in making people feel more alive by creating memorable spaces. These spaces also enhance peoples’ sense of attachment to the environment and help them with wayfinding.

In this interactive session, the audience will engage in a quick mental mapping activity to define built and natural environment features on the University of Redlands campus that stick to their mind. This activity will help the U of R with its south campus design by providing ideas for creating more memorable spaces. The session has two parts.

  • In part 1, the participants will first learn about Kevin Lynch’s method of mental mapping and then locate features on a paper map based on their perception of the campus environment. After this part, which takes about 10-12 minutes, the symposium continues with the other speaker’s talks.
  • In part 2, which can happen at the end of the symposium, the speaker summarizes the results of analyzing the mental maps created by the audience. He briefly explains what features on the campus stick to peoples’ mind the most and provides suggestions for the University of Redlands to create memorable spaces in the south campus design. Part 2 will take about 5 minutes.

Tales Trees Tell: Using Tree Rings to Map Pollution & Drought in the AR Sandbox

The city of Los Angeles leads the nation in production of photochemical smog, a pollutant that forms when sunlight interacts with automobile exhaust (VOCs) to form ozone, NOx, and a host of other atmospheric pollutants (e.g. peroxyacetyl nitrate). The negative effect of these pollutants has been well documented in humans, but less understood is the effect that long term exposure can have on the health of whole ecosystems. Here we compare Ozone and NOx levels in two Pine stands in Southern California and Central North Carolina to quantify the effect these pollutants have had on forest growth over the last few centuries. We then model the spatial distribution of both pollution and tree growth in these two regions using an Augmented Reality (AR) Sandbox. The configuration (real time updating capability) of the AR Sandbox allows us to model how the spatial distribution of pollution has changed through time across the southern United States.

Tracing Depiction of the “Virgin Mary”

The Virgin Mary…Theotokos…Mariam has continuously been depicted throughout history. These images vary depending on the different communities and time periods. This project will focus on five different periods, starting with the Greco-Roman Era and ending in the Early/High Renaissance. Within this range, the Byzantine, Islamic, and Middle Ages will be represented. We are choosing to present images of the Virgin Mary for each time period; however, it is important to note the availability and popularity of images range throughout the eras. Just as the images vary, the titles of the Virgin vary. This project will shed light on the correlation of the time period and the titles used in the images.

The Travels of St. Raphael

Raphael Hawaweeny is a saint in the Eastern Orthodox Church. Born in Syria, he emigrated to America in 1895 and started to spread Orthodoxy from Brooklyn, New York across the United States. St. Raphael is known for developing Eastern Orthodoxy within America. He was an accomplished scholar and author. In his lifetime he published multiple books, created a news paper which is running to this day, and helped to found one of the only seminaries in America. As a Syrian immigrant bishop, St. Raphael was able to stabilize and help the Syrian population in America. Using ESRI tools such as “Social Explorer” and “Arcgis,” I was able to investigate  the route he took, the way education paved this journey, and the legacy he left for both Orthodox Christians as well as Syrian immigrants.

What’s Up with Drones at the University of Redlands?

The Center for Spatial Studies has a fleet of four drones that can be used by students and faculty for research. The Center is here to help you learning how to plan and fly drone missions; gather and process drone images into high-resolution orthophotoquads and 3D models; and integrate such imaging products into ArcGIS Desktop and ArcGIS Pro. During this lightning talk, we will introduce you to our drones and show some imaging products we have created.